Scrolling news:

UK: Syrian peace talks in jeopardy over role of al-Assad’s government

23rd Oct 2013

Arab and Western foreign ministers have urged the Syrian opposition to attend Geneva peace talks next month. Those talks may be in jeopardy over disagreements on the role of President Bashar al-Assad’s government.

Foreign ministers from Arab and Western nations said in London on Tuesday that the Syrian opposition’s attendance at November 23 peace talks in Geneva was “the best hope to improve their lives.”

British Foreign Secretary William Hague said the 11-member Friends of Syria group had agreed to “a number of important steps,” including that the Geneva talks “must lead to the establishing by mutual consent of a transitional governing body.”

He added that President Bashar al-Assad should not be part of a future Syrian government, though he did not echo the position of some opposition factions who say that al-Assad’s government should not take part in negotiations.

“By definition mutual consent means it can only be agreed with the consent of the Syrian National Coalition – so Assad would play no role in that future government,” Hague said. “We urged the National Coalition to commit itself to the Geneva II process and to lead and form the heart of any opposition delegation.”

Hague was joined in London by his counterparts from Egypt, France, Germany, Italy, Jordan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and the United States.

Russia, a strong ally of Syrian President al-Assad’s government, did not attend the London talks. Moscow has previously said that such talks do not represent all Syrian people.

Disagreements over role of al-Assad

The Syrian National Council had previously expressed its opposition to the Geneva conference and threatened to quit the overarching Syrian National Coalition organization if representatives from al-Assad’s government took part.

“The Sultan must leave,” Syrian opposition chief Ahmed Jarba said in the text of a speech to the meeting.

“Geneva cannot succeed and we cannot take part if it allows Assad to gain more time to spill the blood of our people while the world looks on,” Jarba said.

At a press conference after the London meeting, US Secretary of State John Kerry reaffirmed to reporters that the intention was not to assure al-Assad left office before negotiation began, but rather that the negotiations pave the way for a Syria without the controversial president in power.

That view that does not appear to be shared by al-Assad himself. In a recent interview with Lebanon-based pan-Arab satellite channel Al-Mayadeen, al-Assad said he had no plans to vacate the presidency.

“Personally, I don’t see any reason why I shouldn’t run in the next election,” he said.

No military solution

Kerry added that he believed the crisis in Syria had not been resolved with the al-Assad regime’s agreement earlier this year to give up its chemical weapons arsenal, but that a diplomatic solution was the only way forward.

“I don’t know anybody including the Russians and others in the region who are not part of the support group who believe that there is a military solution to this conflict,” Kerry said.

“It is clear that both sides will continue to fight and to fight and to fight, and in the end the greatest victims the people who suffer the most are the Syrian people themselves who are being driven from their homes, who are being killed in the most wanton violence, and are having an increasingly profound impact on the surrounding countries.”

In Syria’s more than 2 years of civil war, more than 100,000 people have been killed and several million more displaced.

dr/ipj (dpa, AFP, AP, Reuters)

 

http://www.dw.de/syrian-peace-talks-in-jeopardy-over-role-of-al-assads-government/a-17176223

One Response to “UK: Syrian peace talks in jeopardy over role of al-Assad’s government”

Moon ShinerOctober 27, 2013

The peace talks which the Russians want to spearhead as their initiative to divert a possible US attack on the Syrian government, it is all a well choreographed between the US and Russian from the beginning.

The war in Syrian did not happen by coincidence or the so call Arab Spring, it is all part of long plan to have Sunni Muslims fight with Shia Muslims in a wide scale war so that the US, Russia and their close circle of countries can exploit the fall out spoils.

The war in Syria is part of the final phase and the next one could be a war between Saudi Arabia and Iran directly as they now are already fighting by proxy in the Syria battle field, the divide and conquer strategy always works well as there are many parties willing to make money at the expenses of their own people.

This nothing new for many of us, we have seen this plan on Infowars website 10 years ago many facts of where this was heading.

Moon Shiner
Montgomery, Alabama

Reply

Leave a Comment

What is 11 + 13 ?
Please leave these two fields as-is:
IMPORTANT! To be able to proceed, you need to solve the following simple math (so we know that you are a human) :-)

Sectarianism in the Middle East and its rise in the UK, Standpoint, Sahar TV. Interview 29 May 2013 and aired on 12 June 2013


Latest Tweets

The Muslim News

awards

Awards for Excellence

Read more